Posts Tagged "kava effects"

Kava Capsules

Posted by on Mar 8, 2016 in Ask Makaira | 0 comments

Kava Capsules

The big “plus” of Kava Capsules is the fact that there’s no mess, they’re super portable, and they’re easy to take. You can definitely get an opportunity to feel the effects of Kava without having to make anything! This is perhaps why they consistently are our #2 product here, ahead of powdered Kava root. As always, give them a try knowing you’re covered by our 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.

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Cultural Uses of Pepper Plants

Posted by on Jul 31, 2014 in The Mind of Makaira | 0 comments

Cultural Uses of Pepper Plants

Aloha everyone, and I hope this post finds you well! It’s a hot, dry midsummer in Hawaii, and as always, I’m grateful to have plenty of quenching ‘awa on hand to refresh me after a hard day of work on the farm! Long-time visitors to this blog know that besides all things kava, one of my foremost passions is reading and research; I still take every opportunity to educate myself on the history, botany and culture surrounding this wonderful plant and its origins. One thing that’s been on my mind recently is the connection between kava and its botanical relatives in the pepper genus, Piper. No species of plant or animal exists in a vaccum of course, and kava is no exception: there are over 2,000 species of peppers scattered around tropical areas of the world, including possibly the most popular spice of all time, black pepper. So I got to wondering: are there other pepper species with cultural uses as broad and significant as those of kava? The answer took me on a fascinating journey into South and Southeast Asia, where peppers have found their way into food, medicine and social settings for hundreds of years! First of all, it’s important to establish what kinds of peppers we’re talking about. I’m writing about peppers that belong to the genus Piper, not the hot chili peppers from the Americas, which are grouped under the genus Capsicum. Although the two genii are related and both have medicinal and cultural uses, I wanted to only look at species closely related to kava kava—otherwise I could literally end up writing a book rather than an article! All right then: Piper is a genus of climbing vines found in tropical regions of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania. Pepper vines usually have heart-shaped evergreen leaves and may bear fruit or flowers, although kava is sterile and can be propagated only with human help. Also interesting, while we harvest kava for her wonderful roots, most pepper species are valued for their fruits or occasionally for their leaves. Black pepper, the most popular condiment in the world, is made from the dried and ground fruits of Piper nigrum, the black pepper vine. Piper nigrum: Those of you who go out of your way to buy whole peppercorns probably know that although black pepper is the best known type of pepper, several different condiments can be made from Piper nigrum fruits. Black peppercorns consist of the whole dried fruit (the seed plus the outer skin), while white peppercorns have had the outer pericarp, or flesh, removed. Red and green peppers are also made by pickling the ripe or unripe pepper grain. Though it’s now ubiquitous, at one time pepper was so in demand and heavily tariffed in Europe that sneaky merchants would sometimes adulterate ground pepper with linseed, mustard, flour or sago. Some even traded fake peppercorns made out of oil and clay with a bit of cayenne added—yuck! Most people don’t think of black pepper as a health food, but research has shown that piperine—the compound in black pepper that gives it spice—increases the absorption of several nutrients from food, including vitamins A, C, and the B complex, selenium, beta-carotene, and curcumin. Black pepper has also been used directly as a stimulant and medicine for all sorts of digestive ailments, such as nausea, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, and dyspepsia. It’s thought that black pepper works to stimulate the digestive tract by acting as a mild irritant to those tissues, which is why pepper is eliminated from the diets of people about to undergo abdominal surgery. As...

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Providing The Best Kava Around

Posted by on Jul 24, 2014 in Featured, The Mind of Makaira | 0 comments

Providing The Best Kava Around

KAVA ALERT: KONA KAVA FARM NOBLE KAVA This post was actually originally an email response to another forum person who felt it appropriate to take a sliver of knowledge they gained to both challenge the quality of the products we work so hard to provide, and to infer that there’s some behind-the-scenes conspiracy going on at Kona Kava Farm and KavaDotCom.  Instead of responding via email each time, this post will serve to answer what is a predictable tone and inappropriate request by this very exclusive minority (6 at most out of literally hundreds of thousands of Kona Kava Farm and KavaDotCom customers). Why even give them space on even one of our posts? Even though we personally know the immense commitment to quality both Kava companies provide, it can still hurt when just a few others try to undermine decades of effort on our part to bring you Kava of a safe and verifiable quality.  We didn’t make it to the top by scamming people; we made it to the top because of our personal care of every one of our treasured customers, because of our passion for the Kava and Kava information we provide, as well as the FDA-compliant, GMP manufactured products that adhere to the strictest of safety protocols. And no, a few disparaging remarks don’t hurt our business; the rare times they’ve happened, we’ve actually seen a SPIKE in sales!  So, any time these rare events happen, it’s an opportunity for us to share what we do here at Kona Kava Farm and now over at KavaDotCom as well.  That makes us very happy as we don’t often toot our own horn! When we say that 2 teaspoons of a Kava extract will contain 95mg of Kavalactone, or when we say that our Kavalactone 30% Capsules actually are manufactured from a Kava extract that contains 33% total Kavalactone, with a lineup of 2-4-6; we’re not guessing.  We’re simply looking at our data sheets from our testing lab, as well as the meticulous manufacturing records that are kept every step of the way. One of the current main themes is Vince Lebot’s Colormetric Kava Test.  This test has been used to get an idea of the possible cultivar of Kava, especially in relation to whether it’s a Noble variety of Kava root or Tudei Kava.  Mr. Lebot’s test has no actual scientific basis; a point he points out himself.  I’ve been informed that he wishes the test wasn’t being used in the way it currently is.  And, he even admits himself that there are exceptions to his test that render it relatively useless for making any real judgments or drawing any conclusions that people have then used as a basis for making disparaging remarks that hurt other real, live business owners and their sometimes-struggling companies. Oddly enough, without fail, we have personally received these kinds of disparaging remarks only from Kava forum members, who we feel, have been unfairly targeting and consciously hurting both Kona Kava Farm, KavaDotCom, and a few other Kava suppliers or information providers we are friends with.  Although acknowledging them only typically empowers and emboldens them, we felt we should at least devote one article regarding this issue to remind our hundreds of thousands of happy customers how much we really do care. With the Tudei Kava test, especially in relation to our Mahakea Kava, we know there are exceptions to the “It must be Tudei Kava!” rule that seems to have been arbitrarily decided on a Kava forum or two.  As we stated above; Vince Lebot knows there are exceptions.  We...

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How Does Kava Relieve Muscle Tension?

Posted by on May 13, 2014 in The Mind of Makaira | 0 comments

How Does Kava Relieve Muscle Tension?

As you may recall, a few months back I wrote a post investigating whether kava could make up a healthy part of an exercise routine, as a post-exercise tonic for relaxing and repairing muscles. The more I delved into these positive associations of kava and exercise, the more I began to wonder, how does kava relieve muscle tension and help relax muscles? Physical Mag Online has started recommending kava as a pre-game tonic for athletes who have a competition the next day, noting that it promotes refreshing, restful sleep, calm focus, as well as relaxes muscles to keep them limber and ready for action. Bodybuilding sites are also starting to promote kava as a treatment for muscle tension and soreness as a result of overtraining: muscles can only repair and rebuild themselves when they are at rest, so kava’s relaxing actions on muscles make it an ideal post-exercise tonic. Of course, kava also provides all these benefits without a next-day hangover or grogginess… no wonder pro athletes like Ruben Wiki are so fond of it! The hypotonic (relaxing) effects of kavalactones on muscles are well-known from decades of research. Some of the earliest experiments involved injecting kava resin intraperitoneally (that is, into the body cavity) in frogs, birds and cats to measure kavalactones’ sedative effects. Kavalactones seem to work mostly on skeletal muscles—those responsible for voluntary movement—though one study I found very interesting suggested that kava extract improves baroreflex control of the heart rate, a measurement that is inversely correlated with the risk of heart attack in people with anxiety disorders. In other words, having better baroreflex control lowers one’s risk of heart attack, and kava extract seems to improve this measure in anxiety sufferers [1]! But I digress: when it comes to kavalactones’ benefits for muscle tension, many people have experienced notable relief from tight or overworked muscles. Joint and muscle pain—particularly back pain—may also be ameliorated with kava. Though the mechanism isn’t fully known yet, I think it’s quite possible that kavalactones’ anti-inflammatory and muscle relaxing actions could also have pain-reducing effects, as tension and pain are often two sides of the same coin. Given all the research that’s been done on kava, it might surprise you to learn that scientists still aren’t sure how kava works its relaxing magic on muscles. Some early theories were that kavalactones regulate GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) in the brain, the neurotransmitter released when we feel relaxed, tranquil and at peace. However, initially researchers couldn’t find kavalactones affecting GABA receptors in the brain. Some current explanations for kava’s calming effect on mental states argue instead that kavalactones affect the limbic system and amygdala. These very old brain structures are thought to have a role in modulating physical drives such as our appetite, libido, and sleepiness, as well as emotions such as fear and anger. As for how kava relieves muscle tension? Well, certain kava experts such as Yadhu N. Singh believe that kavalactones may act directly on the calcium ion channels in muscle cells [2]. Calcium ion channels regulate the electrical signals which produce muscle contractions. In other words, kava may relieve muscle tension by working directly on the cellular mechanism that regulates muscular contractions, rather than by interrupting nerve signals from the brain as do many conventional antispasmodic drugs. I don’t know about you, dear readers, but this sounds like good news to me! I’d much rather take a natural muscle relaxant like kava, in the knowledge that it won’t interfere with my awareness or clarity of mind, than a drug that could have unwanted side effects and leave...

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What Is a Pea-Sized Kava Paste Serving?

Posted by on Apr 22, 2014 in Ask Makaira | 0 comments

What Is a Pea-Sized Kava Paste Serving?

Something we get asked an awful lot here is what the heck is a “pea-sized” serving that we suggest for our Kava paste?  We understand that it’s an unconventional measuring system, and although we thought it was simple, customers seem to be having some trouble with the measure.  So, we’re here to help! How about something conventional when measuring out your Kavalactone doses?  We’ve weighed and re-reweighed product, we’ve looked at it from every angle, and it turns out that 2 pea-sized amounts of Kavalactone Paste equal almost exactly 1/8 of a teaspoon! Now, that couldn’t be simpler.  Instead of having to roll up your Kavalactone paste and measure it against your Green Giant frozen peas to see if the size is a match, now you can simply scoop out 1/8th of a teaspoon, just like a mini ice cream scooper, and get yourself the perfect, safe dose of Kava Kava for your enjoyment. Now, another question is what’s the daily recommended dosage for Kavalactones?  The general FDA guidelines suggest no more than 290mg of Kavalactones per day.  1 pea-sized amount equals about 145mg of Kavalactones in our 55% Kavalactone Paste.  That’s about 1/16th of a teaspoon, but who has a 1/16th teaspoon measure?  Not me! That means if you use the 1/8th teaspoon measure as your guide, that you will be getting your entire daily recommended dose of Kavalactone in a single serving.  Yes, you will get 145mg x 2, which equals your daily dose of 290mg of Kavalactones. I would like to remind you that in Oceania, a single serving of Kava typically sits around 1000mg of Kavalactone.  But, that’s in a culture steeped in Kava, and a culture that may have been genetically conditioned to safely ingest larger amounts of Kava.  As always, every person is different, every body is different, so the best plan to is to see what works for you.  Listen to what your body is telling you.  If you get nauseated from eating Kava, then you need to lower your dose.  If you feel fine after 1/8th of a teaspoon, then you might be agreeable to Kavalactone Paste. Just work with this product responsibly, and don’t over-do it, as with anything in life. Mahalo,...

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